Diving operator receives a certificate of safety management

25 10 2010

The operator of Atlantis Divers Fernando de Noronha (PE), in September received the Certification of Safety Management for Adventure Tourism, as the technical standard ABNT 15331.

This is one of the actions of the Program Safe Adventure Tourism Ministry, Sebrae and  ABETA – Brazilian Association of Adventure Tourism and Ecotourism.

For the owner of the Atlantis Divers, Patrick Muller, certification is a key differentiator for companies. “We believe this gap to better serve our customers and create a qualitative difference. The process was long and laborious process with persistence was that we won the challenge.”

With information Diving Magazine

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Nautical tourism gaining ground in the Brazilian coast

8 03 2010

Recently, Piauí coast also joined the route of Nautical Tourism world due to its favorable conditions for navigation. The area is considered a strategic point on the route of the major international competitions.

With support from the Ministry of Tourism (Ministry of Tourism), the municipality of Luis Correia won the Rally of Sun Island, French regatta with more than 20 sailing boats for seven months, covers many countries.

This year, the state entered the route and received more than 80 sailors. In addition to Luis Correia, the stakes in Brazilian soil also take place in Salvador, João Pessoa, Fernando de Noronha and Fortaleza. Now, the boats head out to Marajó and then Bethlehem of Belém, the boats go up the Amazon to Alter do Chão and then, then conclude the tour in French Guiana.





Sea and history of Pernambuco

12 02 2010



Going through some of the main points of Pernambuco, in Recife, Olinda, Cabo de Santo Agostinho, Ipojuca and the archipelago of Fernando de Noronha, the Route of History and the Sea traces the origins of the people of Pernambuco.

Olinda, first capital of Pernambuco, has a unique charm. During the carnival, the slopes of the city are packed with revelers dancing to the sound of Frevo, the traditional rhythms of Pernambuco. In the remainder of the year, Olinda offers secular churches, historic houses, gastronomy, art and everything expected of a Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

The south of the metropolitan area, the beaches of Cabo de Santo Agostinho, as Suape Calhetas and Coral Bay offer beautiful landscapes. In Ipojuca is Porto de Galinhas, the most famous beaches in Brazil. The beach, which was elected seven times as the most beautiful country, has around places like Wall Alto, Cupe and Maracaípe. Fernando de Noronha, an archipelago located 545km from the capital of Pernambuco, no comments. The Emerald of the Atlantic is one of the most visited by Brazilians and foreigners. The boat trip along the beaches, often accompanied by dolphins, he wrote in the heart of the visitor unforgettable memories.

Source: Ipernambuco





Spinner Dolphin in Fernando de Noronha

20 10 2009

The spinner dolphin is an animal that wins the sympathy of human beings because of their intelligence. Running out of water jumps and beautiful when they are present in flock her show to those lucky enough to catch sight of them.

The archipelago of Fernando de Noronha (PE-Brazil) is one of the main habitats of animals, so that the island is the Spinner Dolphin Project whose goals are:

-Educate the community Noronhense for environmental preservation, creating environmental multipliers among future tourism service providers;
-Empower teens to work with ecotourism;
-Provide subsidies for the development of a sustainable society in Fernando de Noronha;
-Improve the quality of tourism services in the region;
-To study the natural history of dolphins in Fernando de Noronha;
-To study the interaction with dolphins nautical tourism;
-Propose standards for the preservation of spinner dolphins to the competent authorities;
-Propose and participate in actions aimed at conservation of Fernando de Noronha.

The Belvedere Dolphin is the perfect place to spot the animals. The route is a trail of 1 km from the parking lot of the Bay of Sancho. The continuation of the trail Dolphin Bay Sancho, allows the observation of nesting seabirds on the slopes of the bays.

If you are planning to go to Fernando de Noronha, make sure you know the project. For more information contact by e-mail: rotador@golfinhorotador.org.br

 

 





Places to dive in brazil

26 06 2009
With over 4,600 miles of coastline, no wonder scuba diving is Brazil’s national pastime. There is one special place every Brazilian makes at least one pilgrimage to: Fernando de Noronha. Come and discover Brazil’s northeast coastline, the glistening coral reefs and wrecks of Recife and Fernando de Noronha, the island of the Forbidden, and its incredible marine life and resident dolphin community. In the interior, the Amazon river basin is abundant with jungle wildlife and plants from tiny orchids to towering trees. The best way to experience Amazon river area and the rainforest is the stay in one of the lodges that are devoted to preserving the natural environment. 

Bonito e Pantanal (MS)

The Pantanal is a vast wetlands with huge concentrations of exotic neotropical wild fauna. Located between the states of Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso du Sul, the Pantanal is a great place to observe wildlife in their natural state.
In the state of Mato Grosso du Sul is Bonito with its incredibly clear rivers and freshwater caverns and caves for divers. Small accommodations that are part of working cattle ranches host travelers and divers. Your dive vessel here looks a lot like a tractor!

Amazon River Basin

Experience the Amazon, its unique, and often, endangered rainforest flora, fauna and cultures. The town of Manaus is the gateway to the Amazon jungle where the Amazon’s tributaries, the Rios Negro and Ariau, and Anavilhanas Creek snake their way into this ecological wonderland. Explore this region on foot, by small cruise ship, motor boat, canoe or on a fishing expedition, all with encyclopedic guides and overnight stays in comfortable lodges, ship cabins or rustic village accommodations. The world’s largest and most important river basin is a living greenhouse to over 10,000 varieties of plants and sanctuary to over 5,000 species of animals and birds. Take guided hiking trips beneath the canopy of the towering trees and cruise the waterways to discover the strange splendor of this exotic world.

Recife

The carefree beach culture that permeates Brazil’s soul was born here. Once fishermen’s village, today’s Recife is golden sand, colonial antiquities, and Carnival’s send-off spot. Cosmopolitan Recife, where baroque-style architecture and ruins of a colonial past coexist with recent developments is one of the great cities of Brazil. With beautiful churches, museums, forts and convents, excellent music and cuisine, Recife offers great touring as well as an unusual dive adventures. The city is name for the reef (Recife = reef) that has claimed ships from colonial days to today and now offers terrific wreck diving. The Atlantic Brazilian Current makes this a great party spot for concentrations of tropical and pelagic creatures. Twelve shipwrecks lie off the coast in warm, clear waters exhibiting a wealth of fish and corals, with excellent visibility and warm temperatures of 78ºF degrees. War galleons, steamships, tugs and barges date from 1887 to 1986, and await discovery. While in Recife, take time to visit Olinda. Built in the early 1500s, Olinda is one of the largest and best preserved Portuguese colonial towns. Bohemian quarters, art galleries, ornate churches, museums, cobblestone streets, shady squares and festive celebrations make up this historical city. There are a number of resort hotels dotting the coastline of Recife. If you’re heading out to Fernando de Noronha, you generally have to spend at least one night in Recife due to airline scheduling.

Fernando de Noronha

200 miles off the northeastern coast lies a mountainous archipelago made up of 21 islands which are sparsely populated and still the much the way it was when the Portuguese settled here in the 1500s. This National Marine Sanctuary is a heavenly retreat for divers and snorkelers. Due to its open ocean location, it provides pelagic fish and ocean mammals a wonderful refuge. The dive sites include shipwrecks, canyons, amazing volcanic rock and coral formations, a permanent wild dolphin colony, reef sharks, turtles, schooling barracudas and all kinds of rays and colorful fish. Cavort with 600 dolphins, the largest and oldest residential school of spinner dolphins in the world. Dive with juvenile sharks at Lage Dois Irmaos, a breeding and nursery area for fourteen species of reef sharks. The sharks come into this protected area to have their young and the newborn stay to play with divers until they are big enough to venture into the open ocean. You may also witness turtles being released into the wild. Explore the Ipiranga, a Brazilian Navy Corvete, a sunken Portuguese frigate and much, much more. The rock formations are brilliantly colored with encrusting sponges and provide a beautiful backdrop for each of your dives. Experience the warmth of the people staying in pousadas, small family-owned accommodations, with warm showers and family-style meals. Pousadas are classified into A-category or B-category, B-category being more standard.

Salvador Bahia

Salvador, the capital city of Bahia, lies on the beautiful All Saints Bay. A strong African influence comes from the slaves brought here to work in the sugarcane fields over 400 years ago. Multicolored homes, red-tiled roofs, wonderful markets and churches and twisting, narrow cobblestone streets make this an excellent place to visit. The state of Bahia has the longest coastline in the country making it appealing for all nautical sports. Among the fine dives you can do in the Salvador area is to visit the wreck of the Greek cargo ship, Cabo Artemides. The diving is best here between December to February when visibility is ideal.

Abrolhos

Ideal for diving, the Archipelago of Abrolhos, located 45 miles off the southern coast of the state of Bahia, boasts the largest group of cliffs with a great variety of coral and hydracorals. These rock formations harbor one of the largest, rarest and healthy coral reefs in the South Atlantic. Between June and December, the humpback whales, having mated near the equator, migrate to Abrolhos where you can scuba dive and snorkel with them.

Iguacú Falls

A side trip to Iguacú is a must on a Brazil adventure. The Iguacú River flows at amazing speeds over a dramatic ledge a mile and a half long. There are catwalks leading you through the mist to the falls and small boats navigating the bottom of the falls. There are a number of small hotels in this area to explore the falls from. 

Source: http://www.diveguide.com/braz-scuba.htm





Seven affordable, under-the-radar beach destinations

19 01 2009

Fernando de Noronha

Even in rough economic times, it’s important to take a break from the “real world” and treat yourself to some relaxation. At this time of year, it’s preferable to do so on a warm beach. You just have to look a little harder and a little off the beaten path to find affordable destinations. Luckily, I’ve started the research for you and found seven great, lesser-known beach destinations in the Caribbean and Atlantic that also go easy on your wallet.

Los Roques, Venezuela

There may be no better place in the Caribbean to live out your castaway fantasies than Los Roques, an archipelago of 42 sandy islands and about 300 mangrove islets and rocks located 80 miles off the coast of Caracas, Venezuela. Protected as a national park since 1972, the vast majority of Los Roques islands are uninhabited. Those that are inhibited have limited development—there are no cruise ports, and posadas (hotels) may have no more than 15 rooms.

The reefs surrounding the islands boast some of the best biodiversity in the Caribbean, including more than 60 species of coral and 280 species of fish. Above water, the islands give shelter to 92 bird species (such as red footed boobies and pink flamingos) and also host nesting sea turtles. Los Roques’ reliable tradewinds also make it a good spot for sailing, windsurfing, and kiteboarding. As for deserted-island dreams, many posadas can arrange for a day trip or picnic lunch to one of Los Roques’ uninhabited islands.

There are a number of affordable posadas on the islands, including the six-room Posada Movida. Bed and breakfast rates start at $75 per person per night, but it’s a better value to book the all inclusive rate of $120 per person, which covers all meals, wine at dinner, and island boat tour.

Tobago

Unlike its metropolitan and party-hardy big brother Trinidad, little Tobago is content to be a laid-back and natural Caribbean beauty. With the western hemisphere’s oldest protected rainforest, marine parks, and secluded white sand beaches, Tobago has been recognized by World Travel Awards as the World’s Leading Green Destination, a status it was given in 2007. What’s more, whether you come here for a quiet beach honeymoon or an active adventure vacation, you can generally do it pretty cheaply.

Whatever your style, it’s worthwhile to experience both Tobago’s beaches and its wild interior. Tobago was purportedly the inspiration for “Robinson Crusoe,” and even though the deserted beaches described in the novel were based on observations made almost 300 years ago, you can still find such beaches on the island today. Try going to Pirate’s Bay, which was used in the 1954 film version of the novel. You should also plan on a snorkeling trip (25$) to Buccoo Reef, where you can swim with tropical fish in crystal-clear waist-deep water.

To see the rainforest and its many colorful bird species, stay in an eco-lodge or go on a day tour with a local guide. The Cuffie River Nature Retreat, an eco-lodge located on the edge of the rainforest, offers a variety of nature tours including birding walks and visits to secluded waterfalls and natural pools. All inclusive rates for two people start at $185 per night, which includes all meals and a nature walk. If you’d prefer to stay near the beach, try the intimate Hummingbird Hotel, where room-only rates start at $50 a night.

Roatan, Honduras

Roatan, a minnow-shaped island within Honduras’ Bay Islands, attracts divers who come to experience the world’s second-largest barrier reef and those looking for an affordable, laid-back beach vacation in the Caribbean. The island is one of Central America’s once-hidden-now-on-the-rise beach destinations, but thankfully it still lacks big chain resorts and some of the other trappings of mass tourism.

Most Roatan tourists come for the diving and snorkeling, which is among the best in the Caribbean. Besides the coral reefs, you can explore shipwrecks and go on dives specifically to swim with sharks and dolphins. You can also visit the Roatan Tropical Butterfly Garden ($7), go horse-back riding ($35) on the beach, shop at local art galleries, or just relax at one of several open-air seafood restaurants and bars.

The top-rated (according to Trip Advisor, our sister site), hotel on the island, West Bay Lodge, charges a mere $80 a night (based on a four-night stay) for private bungalows with kitchens. The rate includes daily breakfast, a welcome drink, and airport transfers for stays of four nights or longer.

Isla Bastimentos, Panama

Looking for the next Costa Rica? Just head down the coast a few miles to Panama and the Isla Bastimentos, part of the Bocas del Toro archipelago in the Caribbean Sea, a 20-square-mile island that’s a microcosm of some of Panama’s top tourism offerings. Here you’ll find virgin rainforests home to sloths and monkeys, offshore coral gardens and mangrove islands perfect for snorkeling, and stunning beaches pounded by Hawaii-sized waves.

The island’s Parque Nacional Marino Isla Bastimentos ($10 for admission), which encompasses rainforest, beaches, and coral reefs, is an essential stop for all visitors. Most people come to snorkel the coral gardens and Cayos Zapatillas, two little shoe-shaped islets off the main island. On the land, guides can take you on hikes through the forest to see animals like white-faced capuchin monkeys and poison dart frogs. For the best beaches, go to the northern part of the island. Big waves and strong currents make the beaches unfriendly to swimmers, but the sight of the waves and the lack of bathers makes for postcard-worthy strolls.

To really get away from it all, stay at the Al Natural Resort, a series of six open air bungalows set in the forest with views of the sea. Rates start at $180 for the first night and $130 for subsequent nights.

Grenada

Although many people still identify this volcanic Caribbean island with its political turbulence during the 1980s, the face Grenada presents today is one of a friendly, casual, and affordable island destination. The “Spice Island” has something for everyone, including an inviting Afro-Caribbean culture, one of the Caribbean’s prettiest colonial cities (St. George), fragrant spice plantations, dozens of beaches and bays, and a mountainous national park great for hiking.

In the capital of St. George, you can walk along narrow colonial streets lined with a rainbow of pastel-painted houses and shops and watch masted ships sail in and out of the harbor. While in town, browse the spice and food markets and visit the 18th-century French fortification Fort George. If you’re interested in learning more about spices, tour the Gouyave Nutmeg Processing Station (Grenada produces a third of the world’s nutmeg supply) for $1.

Active visitors should try hiking in Grand Etang National Park, perhaps climbing to the top of Mt. Qua Qua, for a commanding view of the coast. For beachcombing, your first choice should be Grand Anse Beach, near St. George, a two-mile-long white sugar-white sand beach with protected waters safe for swimming.

Regarded as one of the best affordable hotels on the island, the English-country-house-style La Sagesse Nature Center is set on one of Grenada’s nicest beaches and offers easy access to nature trails. Prices start at $145 a night.

Staniel Cay, Bahamas

There are more than 700 islands in the Bahamas, but the vast majority of travelers never get beyond the mega resorts of New Providence (home to Nassau), Paradise, and Grand Bahama islands. That means there’s plenty of lightly trafficked “Out Islands” to choose from for an alternative beach getaway. For glassy, gem-colored water, condo-free beaches, affordable accommodations, and some the best sailing grounds in the world, head to Staniel Cay, a two-square-mile island within the Exuma Cays.

Most of the action on Staniel Cay centers around the friendly Staniel Cay Yacht Club, where yachters and landlubbers alike stay, dine, and congregate. Here you can rent 13- and 17-foot boats (from $95 per half day) which will allow you to cruise to some of the uninhabited islets nearby, see marine life like nurse sharks, and visit with the famous “swimming pigs” of Big Major Cay, which paddle out to sea in hopes of getting a handout from sailors. You can also rent snorkel gear ($20) to use at Thunderball Grotto, a natural fishbowl featured in the James Bond film “Thunderball.” Diving, kayaking, and bonefishing are other options.

The Yacht Club offers one-, two-, and three-bedroom waterfront cottages and suites from $145 a night, room only. All-inclusive prices that cover three meals per day, airport transfers, and use of a 13-foot boat, snorkel gear, kayaks, and bicycle start at $162 per person per night.

Fernando de Noronha, Brazil

While most Americans have never heard of it, Fernando de Noronha is regarded by many Brazilians as having the most beautiful beaches in the country—and that’s saying a lot coming from a nation full of sand and sun connoisseurs. With its steep bunny-ear hills that soar up from undeveloped white and gold beaches, Fernando de Noronha might look more at home alongside Bora Bora and the other islands of French Polynesia than it does hundreds of miles from mainland Brazil. But unlike those Pacific islands, Fernando de Noronha is cheaper and easier to get to, at least from the East Coast.

At only seven square miles, the island is easily explored by dune buggy. Pack some snorkel gear and head to beaches like Baia do Sancho and Baia dos Porcos, where you’ll see sting rays, sea turtles, and a wide variety of colorful fish just feet from the shore. Without a doubt, the water surrounding the island— a national marine park—is Fernando de Noronha’s top attraction. Besides snorkeling, you can experience Brazil’s best scuba diving with Atlantis Divers (from about $75 for two dives) and go boating (about $25) to spot spinner dolphins and see the island’s unusual rock formations up close.

In the evenings, head to Vila dos Remedios, the island’s historic heart, where you’ll dance the night away to traditional Brazilian music and eat seafood al fresco at the popular and cheap Bar do Cachorro. For affordable accommodations, stay at the simple but comfortable Pousada Paraiso do Atlantico, where prices for double rooms start around $78 a night.

Fonte: Smart Travel